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Morris, Gerald. 
BALLAD OF SIR DINADAN
New York : Houghton Mifflin, 2003
IL 5-8, RL 6.8
ISBN 0618190996

(2 booktalks)

Click on the book to read Amazon reviews
Booktalk #

Dinadan - he is the youngest son and, as such, does not expect much from his father. What will he do with his life? Well, he can play a rebec and write OK ballads, and he has a good singing voice. The life of a minstrel might suit him just fine. His father changed his plans when he knights Dinadan (barely avoiding cutting off his head in the process), and sends him off to seek his fortune as a Knight. Dinadan packs his armor, clothes, and rebec, takes a charger and his mare and sets off to seek his fortune. Now Dinadan is not real good with a sword and he's not much of a fighter, but he does have a good sense of right and wrong and one other thing--Luck. See how Dinadan saves a castle form outlaws, and joins Culloch, a young Welsh lad headed to king Arthur's court to be knighted. From Arthur's court he sets out on a quest with Sir Kai and Sir Bediver to help Culloch earn his knighthood. Along the way he meets his famous brother, Sir Tristan, saves the reluctant Lady Brangienne and writes ballads about his exploits. Read The Ballad of Sir Dinadan by Gerald Morris. Oklahoma Sequoyah Young Adult Book Award nominee, 2005-2006

Booktalk #2

Dinadan had no desire to be a knight...or for any role of nobility. His older brother, Tristan, was already a famous knight, and Dinadin was happy to write about his famous brothers, play his music, and be a traveling minstrel. His father changed his plans when he knights Dinadan (barely avoiding cutting off his head in the process), and sends him off to seek his fortune as a knight. Dinadan takes his fatherís second-best horse (he is the 2nd son after all) and sets off on his knightly adventure. Now Dinadan is not all that good with a sword, and he's not much of a fighter, either, but he does have a good sense of right and wrong. He's also got a bit of luck! Join Dinadin on his adventure. Heíll meet some other famous knights, like Sir Tristan, his lovesick brother and another knight, possibly the most famous knight in the world. Will Dinadin really become a great knight or sneak off to be a traveling minstrel? Read The Ballad of Sir Dinadan by Gerald Morris to find out. (Prepared by: E. Kim Livingston, SCASL Junior Book Awards)

SUBJECTS:     Knights and knighthood -- Fiction.
                        Minstrels -- Fiction.
                        Tristram (Legendary character) -- Fiction.
                        Iseult (Legendary character) -- Fiction.

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