Nancy Keane's Booktalks -- Quick and Simple
 
Nancy, Ted L.
LETTERS FROM A NUT
New York : Spike, 1997.
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ISBN 0380973545
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This is a compilation of absurd gag letters written to big companies on one page with the companiesí response on the other.  For example, in one, Ted Nancy writes to American Seating Company and asks when you are in a stadium and need to go to or leave your seat, is it proper to pass by the people sitting down with your rear to them or your crotch?  He then proposes a solution of a single row straight up to the top to save everyone the embarrassment.

In another he writes to Nordstrom department store and tells them that a particular mannequin in one of their stores looks exactly like his deceased neighbor.  He asks if he can buy the mannequin to give to his neighbor's family as a sentimental gesture.

In yet another he writes to Emerson College saying that he heard they want him as a speaker on a particular date.  He explains his speech is about how heís been hit by lightning 6 times and as a result for two days thought his name was Mark.  He talks about all of the problems it has caused him like night sweats, a rash and his inability to be around coffee makers.  He asks them to confirm his speech time on that date.

Itís fun to see how some of these companies really struggle with how to reply in a professional manner to his wacky letters.  There is speculation that since Jerry Seinfeld introduces the book, that he is really Ted Nancy, the author.  (Davinna Artibey, Center for International Studies, Denver Public Schools, CO)

SUBJECTS:     Letters -- Humor.
                        Wit and humor.
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